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Mama Deb
mamadeb
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Mama Deb [userpic]
Last Days of Pesach

Otherwise known as the "Pot Roast Chronicles".

Pot roast is an ideal yom tov dish. It's a one pot meal, so you don't have to worry about sides, although you can if you want. It's easy to make - just toss whatever you use over the meat and cook. It cooks itself, too, so you don't have to watch or baste or anything. It can be made on top of the stove, which is useful on Pesach because some people don't use their ovens. It feeds a crowd. It not only reheats beautifully, it's better if it sits, so it can be made ahead. This is useful on second day holiday, when you have to do all the cooking after dark. And, since it's made of a large chunk of meat, it's too expensive to have more often so it just feels festive.

We had three different pot roasts in the past four days. :)



The first was Shabbat dinner. This was mine. My pot roast is very simple. Put the meat in a pan. Cover it with carrots, onions, whole mushrooms and potatoes, top it with a can of crushed tomatoes and a good glug of balsamic vinegar. Use the spices you have available - I had coarsely ground pepper (no Pesach pepper mill) and some dried spices. Cover the whole thing with foil and bake at 350.

Came out lovely with a nice, rich sauce, and lots of it.

The second was Shabbat lunch, which we had at friends. They made an "Italian cholent." Which meant pot roast cooked over night. It was also tomatoey, but she used two kinds of squash. It was delicious and different from mine. Still. :)

So, to put some distance between the two similar meals, my dinner Sunday night was pan fried chicken breast filet, frozen spinach and farfel kugel. I took advantage of the fact that you can cook on yom tov for that day. It worked so nicely.

Lunch the next day was at *other* friends. They'd called the day before to ask us to bring a box of matzah because they were running out. I gave them one of our two remaining unopened boxes of whole wheat.

And what was lunch? That's right. She made it with cinnamon to give it some sweetness, traditional vegetables and no tomato. She also cut it with the grain, which is a mistake with deckel. It was different and very nice, though and, as they're sf fans, we had a lot to take about. I invited them to our house for Shavuot.

And that night - well, I had no choice. That was what we had. I reheated the sauce and veggies in a soup pot, sliced up the meat (against the grain, of course) and put that in the oven to warm a bit. It was even richer this time.

By this time, we were faintly dreading lunch at still another friend's house. Fortunately, she'd made chicken schnitzel instead. :)

And I still have leftovers.

Anyone want them?

Comments
Mmmm, pot roast!

I've been on a deckel diet, for meat. I'm making a cholent out of it. I'll be fine, but yours sounds divine. Go go gadget freezer! (I have two goodly frozen blocks of meat-juice with potato and carrots and onions to later be used as soup stock.)

I spent most of Pesach with a family full of people on no-red-meat diets (we cooked or thawed lots of chicken and fish), then came home to my vegetarian-with-fish kitchen and teensy-weensy collection of Passover dishes. Hence, I am still polishing off the last of a very tasty whole-wheat matzah lasagna.

I do kind of miss my one chance a year to have kosher brisket, though. Mmmmmmm.

Mmmm...leftovers....