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Mama Deb
mamadeb
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Mama Deb [userpic]
The Wedding

The wedding was absolutely lovely.

We got there just in time for the chuppah, the ceremony. Because this was an older couple, it was somewhat pared down. For example, they walked down the aisle by themselves instead being escorted by family members. Also, the bride wore a pink suit with a white blouse and she didn't wear a veil, not even a face one, only a sheitl. She could have worn white, but she chose not to and she looked beautiful. I was surprised she didn't wear a veil over her face, but apparently she was told not to by her rabbi. I don't know the reasons. I have seen other brides at their second weddings wear the bedeken.

She also didn't walk around the groom seven times. However, they said all the proper lines and they read the ketubah and the rabbi gave a short speech, in which he said that second matches come about because of one's deeds, and these two were both very kind (and they both are - kind and dedicated and concerned for others) so this was the proper match for them. They also dispensed with calling up rabbi after rabbi to read the seven brachot that make up the final wedding ceremony. They just had their meseder kedushin ("coach" to all you Bujold fans) read them. All in all, it was quiet and dignified, which suited them both.

I sat with the other ladies of my Saturday afternoon shiur - I've mentioned this before. Each Shabbos afternoon, we gather at my friend Israela's house and take it in turns to teach about the weekly portion. The bride is one of our most valued members because she's as learned as she is gentle and soft-spoken. My husband, therefore, sat with the husbands. I had a lot of fun because, well, I know these ladies. We've been meeting for two years now. Jonathan knew only a couple of the husbands and was bored. But at least the food was good - even the soup wasn't too salty, which is an accomplishment. And it was nicely garlicky, too. And I got to dance with the bride, something I almost never do.

We're also connected to the groom - his daughter is the treasurer of our synagogue. So she's also following in the tradition of service. And she looked spectacular. She's very petite and normally wears dresses that make her look smaller and younger than she is, but not in a good way. Today she wore a black top over a black chiffon skirt, and over that a sort of off-the-shoulder fuschia jacket with a deep folded over collar. And she looked very sophistocated and beautiful. Apparently, her sister found her the outfit.

And during the dancing, Rebecca would join in on the periphery and her new stepmother would pull her into the center to make her know she was family. It was just nice to see.

As I said, it was just lovely. God should grant they have a long and happy life together.

Comments

How heartwarming. :D

Badeken isn't the veil, it's the inspection to see if she's the right woman. From the same root as Bodek (vegetables) or Bedikah (cloths) - to check, inspect.

Er, nope. Badecken means 'to cover'. The badeckenish is the veiling ceremony, when the groom covers the bride (no, NOT in the agricultural sense; get your mind out of the gutter, Zev). Babelfish translates 'to cover' as bedecken, and bedecken as 'cover'. (It renders badecken as 'bath-hit a corner'.)

The root is related to the English word 'deck'. M-W says 'deck' comes from Middle English dekke covering of a ship, from (assumed) Middle Dutch dec covering, probably from Middle Low German vordeck, from vordecken to cover, from vor- for- + decken to cover; akin to Old High German decchen to cover.

Any resemblance to the Hebrew root BDQ is completely coincidental.