?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Mama Deb
mamadeb
.:::.:....... ..::...:
Mama Deb [userpic]
Rosh HaShanah

The first part of the Tishrei Holiday Marathon is now over.



Day 1

Wednesday Night. We managed to slide into Yom Tov with relatively few problems. Our friend Z.M. came for dinner - the soup was good, the turkey was underdone (the white meat and the drumsticks were perfect; the dark meat was pink) and I liked the stuffing. We had slices of honey cake for dessert. And a lot of good conversation until it was 10PM and ZM had to leave.

This turned out to be a good thing because the FBI woke him up at 5:30 to hand him a subpeona that he couldn't sign because, well, *holiday*. And he still has no idea what it's about - they asked him questions about things he had no knowledge about. He's getting a lawyer plus a note from our rabbi because they want him to appear on Hoshana Rabbah, which is the day before Sukkot, in Virginia. This is not good.

We got to synagogue just at the end of the repetition of the morning service Amidah. I managed to catch up before the end of the Torah reading. Our synagogue has fast R"H services - we begin at 8:30, have a twenty minute break in the middle and end at 1:15 or so. Yes, that *is* fast. Other synagogues end much later. So I really have no problems getting there late. :)

I wasn't fond of my seat - it was very close to the ladies' room, which meant a lot of traffic, and it was rather far from the mechitza so I didn't hear announcements. I *did* hear the rabbi's speech, though, so that was good, and the cantors were wonderful - clear and musical without getting too fancy.

Lunch was gefilte fish (baked with hot salsa), salad and turkey sandwiches. Then there wasn't much to do, besides a break to say mincah, until it was dark.



Day 2

We had three guests the second night. R showed up just before full dark, so we chatted for a while before we were able to do anything for the next day. She helped me clear and set the table, and we set up candles for her to light, while I began heating up dinner. By the time Jonathan came home from synagogue and my mother and her boyfriend showed up, everything was ready.

We had slices of gefilte fish and salad, the soup, pot roast with its vegetables and slices of honey cake that my mother brought with sugar free chocolate tofutti. Every thing was *perfect* - the fish was delicious and we didn't need horseradish because the salsa was so spicy; the soup was perfect and I got to give R a bowl full of noodles, to which she said "yum", and the pot roast was easily the best I've made. This was because I spent a lot of money and bought a very good cut. It didn't fall apart when I sliced it, it was tender and meaty and...perfect. And if the honey cake was a tad dry, the tofutti wasn't bad at all.

R was happy to be there - her father recently remarried and she's feeling rather overwhelmed. She's in her thirties and she all of a sudden has a sixteen year old stepbrother. I know her stepmother, and she's a lovely, warm person. but I can see this. She was tired of being an appendage, an afterthought to her father and stepmother. But we think of her as just her - our synagogue treasurer, a lovely young woman and a nice person.

As for my mom and Lenny - well. :) Mom is wearing a claddagh ring. And so is *he*.

It's adorable. She says nothing is being announced or talked about or anything until after his wife's unveiling. But she's met his kids, he's met hers, and his kids have also met my brother. And everyone gets along.

Lenny is nothing like my father - my father was brilliant and unique, and Lenny is not. But he's sweet and he loves my mother and he wants to make her happy. What more could a daughter want? Except he also likes my cooking. :) We subjected him to the Wedding Album. He liked the picture of my mom and dad dancing.

I got to shul even later the next morning - but made it in time for the haftarah. This was important because Jonathan read it. And I had no problems hearing him, either. And I'd said the first part of the services at home so I didn't have to catch up there. We got invited to lunch and accepted. This is a family we've known forever. They're talking about making aliyah - moving to Israel - and if they do, we're going to be spending a lot on airfare to go to weddings and bar mitzvahs. :)

On the way home, we met my husband's Talmud teacher, who lives a couple blocks from us. This was nearly 4PM. We were leaving after an extended lunch. He and the two of his kids with him were leaving services.

Morning services.

I said we finished early. :)

We got home, Jonathan took a nap and I started preparations for Shabbat dinner and lunch, because, you know. That was coming. It's not really technically permitted, but we both managed showers beforehand. Three days is just. Icky.


Shabbat

Dinner was pot roast and salad. Lunch was turkey, carrots and kugel. I didn't go to shul - it was wet and rainy, and we were awakened by the *crack* of a lightning bolt directly over our head. Like the rest of the neighborhood. Otherwise, I napped and read and read and napped.


I'm not going to even try catching up on my flist. But it was a good holiday.

Next Shabbat: Yom Kippur. And then we start on the minor construction.

Comments

Glad you had a good one. Mine was full of sleep, and disturbing talks about my marriage, and more sleep. Not sure what to do about my flist. Or Succos. But, Gmar Chasimah Tovah!

Shanah Tovah! I'm sorry we never made it out by you, but it sounds like your day was pretty full. :)

Shana tova! I'm glad it was a good Yom Tov/Shabbat for you.

I once went to Conservative RH morning services and had been under the impression that they didn't leave anything out (not that I would have necessarily spotted omissions), but they were only four hours. Now you've got me wondering.

And then we start on the minor construction.

Shake shake shake


Shake shake shake



Shake your lulav, Shake your lulav...