?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Mama Deb
mamadeb
.:::.:....... ..::...:
Mama Deb [userpic]
Nervous

It's still a balmy 97F (with heat index of 107F) and tonight/tomorrow is Tisha B'Av. No food, no water. 25 hours.

Frankly, even though we have air conditioning and I do have medical permission, I'm scared. I'm feeling lousy even sitting in an air-conditioned office and drinking water all day - how will I be without water? Although the feeling lousy could be nerves.

A big rabbi has ruled that fasting is forbidden to any one with any condition who is trapped in the heat wave, but he's not MY rabbi, and it's not up to them - I just emailed my doctor. He's said I could fast, but it wasn't a heat wave then. Also, the city is reducing voltage, so our air conditioning is not working 100%. This is good- far better than a power outage and not having ac at all - but makes things harder.

Edited to add - Jed the doctor emailed me back. Given HCTZ and the heat - no fasting. I can deal with that.

Comments

Maybe you should ask the doctor about the water part, given the current conditions.

I did, considering he'd forgotten I'm taking a diuretic.

Really, I know several rabbis who'd actually go further and say you MUST drink, pikuah nefesh.

Rabbi Weissmandl (big rabbi I mentioned) agrees, but it's a medical issue, too.

I'm nervous about the fast too. I don't have any medical reason not to, other than the heinous heat, but I don't have AC other than at the office, and the current project includes long phone calls describing errors to be fixed, which are hard even when I can drink water.

Do you know anyone with air conditioning? Or will there be a Tisha B'Av program somewhere local?

Though it's been a long time, it was always impressed on me that health issues supersede fast requirements. Check with both medical and rabbinical authorities, and I suspect that they will confirm an okay (or even require) that you drink adequate water, at the very least.

Stay healthy. That's the most important thing. (Oh, good grief -- I'm turning into my mother! :-)

It does and it doesn't. I might well drink water tomorrow but tomorrow is a RABBINIC fast and one rules leniently.

Yom Kippur is a bigger problem (but as it will be in late September, I'm less worried about it.)

I forgot about Tisha B'Av. I don't believe it. Er, thanks for reminding me.

I'm confused as to whether you contacted your rabbi yet? That would seem to be the thing to do.

For a rabbinic fast, I consulted my doctor. And he said I could...

You have medical permission.

Use it.

The idea behind various kinds of fasting is, utimately, to make us pause, reflect, and grow -- all of which is undermined if we sick or the fast makes us sick(er).

And, as a desert rat, let me tell you, 107f is HOT.

(And if you can, get one of those battery operated personal fans.)




I have medical permission TO fast.

And, um. The idea behind this fast is to mourn and feel miserable. (Not that we need help right now.)

ugh...

i would guess that as long as the AC is up and running and you are sure to not be too active, then you'd be fine...

i would still make sure you have water set aside "just in case" the power goes kerplooey and you end up over-heated and sick...

you do NOT want to end up in the ER (G-d forbid)...

have a good fast!...
shalom!
Eve & Co.

As I now have medical orders to NOT fast, I'm not going to. Well, maybe tonight, but not tomorrow.

I talked to a friend of mine who is both a rabbi and a doctor about Naomi fasting -- she wasn't able to pump much before the fast, so the baby's going to be getting a certain amount of fluid out of her.

What he recommended was to try for, at a minimum, fasting until chatzot tomorrow. Then, if she really felt she needed it, to drink in the afternoon -- an ounce every nine minutes would be better than a big drink all at once, halachically. He also recommended either water or very diluted juice, as hydration is more important than calories.

I realize that he's not your doctor, or your rabbi, and that the situation isn't really analagous. But it is halachic advice, of a sort, and I figured it might give you something to ask about tomorrow, if you're not feeling up to fasting the whole way through.

My doctor has told me no fasting. So, I'll at least drink water.

I am nervous about the heat, too. The summer I worked as a camp counselor outside of Waco, Texas, none of the staff fasted -- the heat was so profound that we were all obligated to drink a certain amount every day, and to ensure that our campers did, too. Only one of my friends fasted that year, and she had a really tough time with it...

I hear you about suspecting your motives, inasmuch as you don't want to fast so on some level it would feel nice to have an excuse not to. That said -- this is record heat, and that can be genuinely dangerous. So please be careful, however you decide to observe.

Halachically, I have to listen to my doctor in this case.

So. No fasting and that has nothing to do with my feelings. Which is good.

HCTZ? That's Kabbalah, right?

I am very glad to hear you won't be fasting. I know you are devout, but I have had just a taste of what you are going through.

I just flew home from New York City (we arrived in Orlando @ 4pm) and I know how hot it is. My brother, who also lives in Brooklyn, doesn't have air conditioning, just fans, and I sweat the entire time. Despite drinking gallons of water (I don't think I am exaggerating, either) I hardly ever went to the bathroom. It amazed me when I realized how much I was sweating out.

I would hate to think of you going without water, even for 25 hours. Can you give up something else? What about speaking with the exception of work responsibilities?

I would hate to think of you going without water, even for 25 hours. Can you give up something else? What about speaking with the exception of work responsibilities?

It doesn't work that way. If I really couldn't do this, maybe there are things I could study, but we can't exchange restrictions or pick them for ourselves. I'll probably drink something this afternoon, but so far I'm fine.